Center of The World / Granite

The Center of the World
Felicity, CA

Felicity is also the home of the Museum of History in Granite
There are 922 granite panels installed, 700 are etched with history and the rest will document future events.

The Church on the Hill
The 150,000 ton "hill of prayer" is man made.


The graveyard behind the church





Staiway to?

Learn more at History in Granite

Weekend / Stuff

Alvin Lustig chair for Paramount Furniture in Los Angeles. I can't wait to get the awful 90s green suede off.

Lamps, including Gross Wood and Heifetz

Clay, including Beato and David Stewart


Tanya Aguiniga / JF Chen

Tanya Aguiniga fiber sculpture at JF Chen



More Tanya

The Clair Graham room


I really wanted to take this Lester Geis Heietz lamp

This Mitchell Bobrick Controlight too

The Taliesin Architects / San Diego


Frank Lloyd Wright design for a Cinema in San Diego (1905)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Legacy in San Diego: The Taliesin Architects
In the decades following World War II, those who had studied under architect Frank Lloyd Wright in both Spring Green, Wisconsin and Scottsdale, Arizona through his Taliesin apprentice program, designed and built a fabulous array of structures throughout San Diego. Five of them – Sim Bruce Richards, Loch Crane, Frederick Liebhardt, Vincent Bonini and William Slatton lived and/or established their architecture practices in San Diego. In addition to these focal studies, the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and his two sons Lloyd Wright and John Lloyd Wright (the latter lived in Del Mar), as well as others heartily influenced by the Wright legacy will be presented.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Legacy in San Diego: the Taliesin Architects will frame the remarkably rich portfolio of work with architectural drawings and models; period and contemporary photographs; as well as objects and ephemera. The exhibition will display, for the first time in San Diego, Frank Lloyd Wright’s unbuilt designs in the region – Cinema for San Diego (1905) and House for Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Furgatch (1959).
Congratulations to Keith York from Modern San Diego and all thet were involved in making this happen! Word on the street is that there's a lamp and coffee table by Loch Crane and a table, tiles and a sofa by Bruce Richards.

 
The Onion House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg and Bill Slatton.Courtesy of the Elizabeth von Beck Archives via Modern San Diego

Louise Liebhardt Residence, La Jolla (1958) by Frederick Liebhardt
Photo: Douglas Simmonds
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Legacy in San Diego: the Taliesin Architects at the La Jolla Historical Society Wisteria Cottage galleries opens September 26, 2015 – January 17, 2016. Wisteria Cottage is located at 780 Prospect Street in La Jolla.  Public hours are Thursday – Sunday, 12:00 noon – 4:00pm.  Admission is free.
More information: La Jolla Historical Society

Tackett / Thursday

La Gardo Tackett

Cranbrook / Bloomfield Hills

Cranbrook Academy of Art Library and Museum (1942) by Eliel Saarinen
These are hallowed grounds in term of design. Harry Weese, Charles and Ray Eames, Harry Bertoia, Florence Knoll, Benjamin Baldwin, Ralph Rapson, Kevin Roche, Edmund Bacon and Eero Saarinen all went to Cranbrook.
Charles Eames (behind camera), Eero Saarinen to the left of Eliel Saarinen (center with hat) on the site during construction.
Source: Cranbrook


Eliel designed some great doors

Harry Bertoia
There was a great Bertoia print and jewelry exhibition in the museum, but they didn't allow photography. 

Bertoia and Eero Saarinen hanging out with Sol LeWitt (walls)


Pipsan Saarinen Swanson for Ficks Reed

Steve Frykholm posters for Herman Miller



Weekend / Stuff

Cabinet by Maurice Martine

Other stuff


Tackett / Thursday

¡¿ Tackett en Español !?

Weekend / Stuff

Maurice Martine

With photos and pegboard

Paul Mayen

Smalls

Yamasaki / Noguchi

Dodge Fountain at Philip A. Hart Plaza by Isamu Noguchi
One Woodward Ave (1963) by Minoru Yamasaki is in the background.


One Woodward Ave was Yamasaki's first skyscraper. Not bad.



Busted
I guess I wasn't supposed to be taking photos inside the building.

A pedestrian bridge was added in the 1980s that connects to the Guardian Building (1929). The bridge is closed now.
The People Mover tracks are below.

Someone has been trying to get the bridge converted into a bar/nightclub. Read about it here. I'd like to see a coffee shop.

Noguchi is dry. I suppose Detroit has bigger issues to deal with in terms of infrastructure.

High security Noguchi. I wonder who they're watching?

It must be the Canadians. They're right across the river.