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Showing posts from October, 2018

Robin Gay McCline / Fresno

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There was a great house for sale in Fresno. It was designed in 1970 by Fresno architect Robin Gay McCline as his personal residence. He must have been friends with Stan Bitters because there sure is a lot of  his work in the house. It was listed for $450,000 and went fast.
According to the listing, McCline was a prolific watercolor artist, architect and educator who worked with the likes of Jim Oakes, Robert Stevens and Gene Zellmer during Fresno's burgeoning years. 







More information here.

Weekend / Stuff

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David Cressey for Architectural Pottery
Peter Shire, 1980
You know I love my little wire accessories. Here are baskets by Sol Bloom and a tray by Archie Kaplan, both for New Dimensions.
All this belonged to the Frank Bros family and the toys were shiow at Frank Bros. : The Store that Modernized Modern exhibition that was held at the University Art Museum at CSULB.
Here's the Finn Juhl ice bucket when it lived in the Frank's Case Study House 25, which was designed by Edward Killingsworth. 
Source: Photo: Julius Shulman, Getty Research Institute

Bruno Munari Polariscop

Modernism / Downtown Los Angeles

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Downtown Modernism Show in Los Angeles Sunday, October 28th It only happens twice a year.
This really is the best market around.

Nevada City / Architecture

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Nevada City Firehouse No. 1 (1861)
Discovery of gold in 1848 brought people from around the world to California. By 1850, Nevada City, California was home to 10,000 people. The town grew quickly and became an important city in the state. With the gold mining industry dwindling, population decreased and the town was struggling financially.  
In the 1960s and 70s hippies and back-to-the landers moved in and brought new attention and commerce to a sagging Gold Country downtown that was half full of empty stores. At the same time, city leaders were early in recognizing that historic preservation could be the foundation of a strong tourist trade.
The entire gold rush era downtown district is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Nevada City Downtown Historic District is the largest and most representative collection of downtown commercial buildings in the area of the Northern Mines and is noted as the most complete gold town left in California.  Read more here
The town is thr…

Weekend /Stuff

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Milo Baughman for Murray Furniture
Smalls
Soleri

Architecture Tour / Long Beach

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LONG BEACH MODERN ARCHITECTURE TOURSaturday, October 13 from 10 am - 4 pmSix Mid-century Modern Masterpieces
Gibbs & Gibbs Office, by Donald Gibbs (1963) 
The Mcwilliams Residence, by John W. McWilliams (1958) 
The Killingsworth Residence, by Edward A. Killingsworth (1961) 
Clock, Waestman, Clock Law Offices, by Killingsworth, Brady, Smith (1957) 
The Pekrul House, 1968 addition to 1924 bungalow by Paul Tay for owners Gus and Carolee Pekrul 
The White House, collaboratively designed by architect Bill Lockett and owner Dr. Katherine White (1957)  More information and tickets, here The Killingsworth Residence, by Edward A. Killingsworth (1961)
Source: Julius Shulman, © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute

San Diego House / A. Quincy Jones

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This weekend I went to an open house in Ramona for an A. Quincy Jones home that's for sale. It was hosted by Keith York of Modern San Diego. You might be asking yourself, how did an A. Quincy Jones house land in a small rural community like Ramona?
The house was commissioned by Everett and Elrena Warnes through Cal-Sun Building Co.

 In 1948, A.C. Hvistendahl asked A. Quincy Jones to design an exhibition house to meet the need Hvistendahl saw for low-cost contemporary housing in San Diego. 


The prototype was a wood post and beam 1,000 square feet home with 2 bedrooms. It's known as the "San Diego" house.


 The concept won an AIA award for Builder's House of the Year.  After seeing this article, Joseph Eichler contacted Jones and they made thousands of homes together. 
Source: Architectural Forum, 1950
As of 1950, 28 "San Diego" houses had been built. It's unclear exactly how many were built in total. Keith has a list of the ones that are known in San…