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Showing posts from 2021

Weekend / Stuff

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Kipp Stewart and Stewart MacDougall for Glenn of California,  Apple by Ingeborg Lundin for Orrefors, Arthur Umanoff stool and an Earthgender planter La Gardo Tackett Smalls

Weekend / Stuff

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  Maxwell Yellen stool and various smalls Vivika and Otto Heino Sori Yanagi

Weekend / Stuff

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  Stools by Henry P. Glass David Stewart creamer and two more Japanese books from a set that focuses on design details.  Here is my whole set.

Goldberg / Glen Lukens

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This weekend I bought a crackle glaze ceramic bowl. With a 20" diameter, the scale is impressive. The first thing I thought of was Glen Lukens. The glaze and shallow bowl form seem so related. The clay looks right. Upon turning it over, I see it's signed Goldberg. It's a great signature too.   The obvious next step is to look for a Goldberg who studied under Lukens.  A lot of well-known ceramicists were taught by Lukens. This includes Doyle Lane, Beatrice Wood, Myrton Purkiss and  F. Carlton Ball.  Someone considerably more famous than all of them, but not as a ceramist, also took his ceramics class. That was a 19 year old Frank Gehry. Source: “Making Better Mud Pies”: A Conversation with Frank Gehry More about the Luken's Soriano house, which I visited a couple years ago, is  here .  So I obviously knew about the link between Gehry and Lukens, but what I didn't know is... " Frank Goldberg" changed his name to "Frank Gehry" in 1954, the same y

Weekend / Stuff

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  George Nelson vanity stool, early Jens Quistgaard bowl, David Cressey, Greta von Nessen Anywhere Lamp and a big crackle glaze bowl (more on that later). It's a baby Cressey. This Pro Artisan flamed glazed pot is a John Follis form. More clay

Greta Von Nessen / Anywhere Lamp

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Greta von Nessen (December 6, 1898 – 1975)   The Swedish designer was a graduate of the School for Industrial Arts in Stockholm.  She met her german-born husband Walter when he was in Stockholm working for Greta’s father, a prominent architect. Greta and Walter moved to the US in 1925 and they established Nessen Studio in 1927.  In 1936 Walter designed the now prolific swing arm lamp. For some reason MoMA dates the lamp at 1927 but all the sources I've found say 1936. Photo: MoMA Or did he? Walter gets all the credit but perhaps he shouldn't. Source: Baltimore Sun, 1952 This also seems to suggest that Greta should be given some credit for the "famous Von Nessen swing arm". During WWII Greta worked as a multilingual operator with The United States Office of War Information (OWI). Walter died in 1943. She reopened Nessen Studio in 1945 and continued designing lamps. She said the only tradition she believed in is that of sound design and uncompromising quality. Source: D

Weekend / Stuff

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Jack Boyd X 2 and George Nelson ("Numbers", 1959 designed by George Nelson Office Associate Don Ervin)

Weekend / Stuff

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Robert Maxwell, David Stewart and some Scandi-smalls. La Gardo Tackett for Architectural Pottery Alexander Girard fabric Pottery Shack yard stick. Pottery Shack was located on Coast Highway in South Laguna. It was established in 1936 with a truckload of Bauer factory seconds. In addition to production California dinnerware like Metlox, Vernon, Red Wing and Harker; they held pottery and glass blowing demonstrations. The work from the demonstrations was then sold in the shop.  If you've done much ceramic shopping in California, you have no doubt turned a few pots over to find "Pottery Shack" and a last name inscribed into the bottom. Some of them are decent and some not so much. Singleton is a name often seen, who turns out to be Rita. Lyman is another, but Taylor is the only one I could find a little information on.  Here's Jack Taylor at his Pottery Shack wheel in 1963. He moved to Laguna Beach in 1945. Trained as a  painter, he had never thrown a pot before moving to

Domes / InnerConn Technology

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I found myself at the Domes of Casa Grande again. This is an update to my  2015 visit  when my friend Kristen wrote a guest post about the domes.   Just as an overview, InnerConn Technology, a circuit board manufacturer from Mountain View, California planned to move their manufacturing facilities 10 miles south of Casa Grande, Arizona. The company created a subsidiary called Dome Industrial & Homebuilders Inc. They planned to build the dome project in three phases, the first was the office, then then manufacturing plant and housing would come next. Unfortunately, they never moved beyond a short-lived office phase. The domes have sit vacant since 1982.  The domes during construction in 1982. Source: Arizona Daily Star Source:  Casa Grande Dispatch Source: Casa Grande Dispatch